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Bras: Most Asked Questions

How do I determine my bra size?

We recommend being professionally fitted at least once a year. A bra fitting may be necessary more frequently with specific body changes including: pregnancy, breast feeding, weight change, menopause and surgical procedures.

We recommend a professional fitting rather than giving you general steps to fit yourself. In between fittings, you can use these guidelines or “points of fit” that will allow you to check the fit of your current bra(s).

Points of Fit:


Straps: Should sit straight and flat, there should be tension, but you should be able to run a finger under them comfortably.

Cups: Should lay flat against the body. If there is gapping at the top of the cup, you probably need to go down one cup size. If your breasts are ‘bulging out’ of the top cup, you need to go up at least one cup size

Center Gore (center front): Should lay perfectly flat with your breast bone. If it is painful and digging in, you need either one cup size bigger or a different style of bra.

Underwire: Should rest under the arm pit just behind the breast tissue, not on the breast tissue. We like to equate this concept to a letter and an envelope: the envelope (underwire) must be slightly larger than the letter (breast) so that the letter fits comfortably inside. If the underwire pokes or rests on top of the breast, you need a larger cup size or a different style of bra for your body type.

Band: Should lay straight (horizontal / parallel to the floor) and low across the back. It should fit snug, but you should be able to put one finger underneath. This is the most important “point of fit” in a bra since 70% of the support comes from the band! If you can fit more than one finger under the band or the band is “riding up” in the back, you need to go down at least one band size.

It is important to note that not every bra is for every body type. You may be wearing the correct bra size, but not wearing the proper style of bra for your body type. This is another reason why it is important to have a professional consultation.

How can I find a comfortable bra?

Your bra should be comfortable if you are wearing the correct bra size and style for your body type. If it has been more than a year since your last fitting, something may have changed which is causing your discomfort. We recommend you have a professional fitting to help assess your needs for support and comfort.

Not every bra is for every body type. You may be wearing the correct bra size, but not wearing the proper style of bra for your body type.

Review the following guidelines or “points of fit” to troubleshoot the fit of your current bra(s) and help identify a better-fitting bra.

Points of Fit:
Straps: Should sit straight and flat, there should be tension, but you should be able to run a finger under them comfortably.

Cups: Should lay flat against the body. If there is gapping at the top of the cup, you probably need to go down one cup size. If your breasts are ‘bulging out’ of the top cup, you need to go up at least one cup size

Center Gore (center front): Should lay perfectly flat with your breast bone. If it is painful and digging in, you need either one cup size bigger or a different style of bra.

Underwire: Should rest under the arm pit just behind the breast tissue, not on the breast tissue. We like to equate this concept to a letter and an envelope: the envelope (underwire) must be slightly larger than the letter (breast) so that the letter fits comfortably inside. If the underwire pokes or rests on top of the breast, you need a larger cup size or a different style of bra for your body type.

Band: Should lay straight (horizontal / parallel to the floor) and low across the back. It should fit snug, but you should be able to put one finger underneath. This is the most important “point of fit” in a bra since 70% of the support comes from the band! If you can fit more than one finger under the band or the band is “riding up” in the back, you need to go down at least one band size.

Why is it important to to wear bras with that fit properly?

A properly fitting bra has multiple benefits:

• For overall comfort
• Prevents future sagging
• Relieves back pain caused by the weight of breasts
• Improves posture
• Helps you look better in your clothes
• Instills confidence

How do I find the right bra for my body type?

Bust types typically fall into three categories: shallow bust, average bust and full bust. We can recommend the best bras for you once you’ve identified your bust type.

If your breasts lack volume at the top, your bust shape is most likely "shallow". In some cases, you may have lost firmness due to pregnancy or weight change. You have a "Shallow" bust

If your breasts are perky and have an apple shape, then most bra styles are able to accommodate you. You have an "Average" bust. 

If your breast have an all around melon shape and are as round at the top as they are at the bottom, your bust shape is most likely "full". You have a "Full" bust. 

There are even more specific factors that go into consideration when recommending the best bra for your body: your breasts may be “wide or narrow set”, you may be “petite” have “sloped shoulders” or have a “long torso”. All of these factors can go into identifying the best bra for you. 

What are the most common bra mistakes made by women?

1. Buying a bra too large in the band and too small in the cups. To correct this mistake, try a bra on one band size smaller and two cup sizes larger. (Trust us, the cup size may sound too big to you, but it is all relative to the smaller band size.)

2. Adjusting the straps as tight as possible to get lift. To correct this mistake, re-evaluate the fit. The band should be doing all the lifting, not the straps. You should be able to slip the straps off of your shoulders and your breasts should still be supported!

3. Wearing the same bra day after day. We all have our favorites, but you should always give your bra a day to relax in between wears. This gives the elastic and fabric a chance to fully “bounce back” to its original state. This will improve the longevity of your bras and the support they give you.

How do I know if my bra straps are adjusted properly?

Below are some guidelines to make sure your straps are adjusted properly. Your straps should sit straight (vertically), there should be tension, but you should be able to run a finger under them comfortably.

You should avoid the following:

Straps too tight: If your straps are digging in and doing too much work, your band may be too loose. The weight of the breasts should be lifted from the band, not pulled up from the straps.

Straps too loose: Your straps should not be pulled in towards your neck. This happens when your straps need to be tightened more, but they are adjusted as far as they can go. You then try to pull them inward to lift your breasts more or to keep them from falling off of your shoulders. You may need to find a bra with more strap adjustability (fully-adjustable straps), go down a band size so the band does the lifting instead of the straps, or this may not be a good style for your body type.

What setting should my bra's closure be on for a proper fit?

When you are trying on a bra, you should use the loosest setting or column of the hook and eye closure.

If you purchase the bra on the loosest setting you have at least two other settings to tighten the band as time goes on. The band will relax through it’s lifetime of washings and wearings, so it is important to have the option of tighter settings so you can get the longest life and proper support out of your bra.

If you purchase a new bra on the tightest hook already, as the band relaxes, you have no tighter setting to move to. You are left with a bra that doesn’t give you the proper support and doesn’t last as long as it is intended to.

When can I wear a lace bra?

Lace bras are not just for date night anymore! Super-soft, flat laces and embroideries work in all types of bras and for all types of busts. Some lace bras even give more support and lift than seamless bras.

Lace bras can be worn under almost anything without showing through. Sheer tops and very tight-fitting tops and dresses may minimally show the lace bra styles. 

What bra should I wear with low-cut dresses?

 

If the center front is very low and plunging like a v-shape, choose a plunge bra. They have minimal coverage at the center front and the cups are specially designed to provide ultimate support while showcasing your curves.

If the neck-line of your top is a scoop or square-neck, you may need a bra with half-cups or demi-cups. Demi bras come with and without padding. “Demi” just refers to the coverage of the cup itself. 

The best way to prevent showing nipples is by choosing a bra with a light padding (contour cups). These bras are commonly called t-shirt bras. The thickness of the padding in t-shirt bras does not increase your bust size, but it smooths and gives you invisibility under your clothes.

I don’t want my bra to show through even the thinnest of tops. What bras are best for me?

The best way to prevent showing any lines is by choosing a bra with a light padding (contour cups). These bras are commonly called t-shirt bras. The thickness of the padding in t-shirt bras does not increase your bust size, but it smooths and gives you invisibility under your clothes. 

I don’t want my bra to show through even the thinnest of tops. What bras are best for me?

The best way to prevent showing any lines is by choosing a bra with a light padding (contour cups). These bras are commonly called t-shirt bras. The thickness of the padding in t-shirt bras does not increase your bust size, but it smooths and gives you invisibility under your clothes.

Underwires are uncomfortable. Do I really need a bra with underwire?

If your underwire is poking or uncomfortable, you may not be wearing the correct size or style for your body type. You should have a professional fitting at least once a year, but in between, you can perform your own spot checks by using our “points of fit” guide below. Remember, you may have the right size, but just not the right style. Points of Fit (relating to underwire discomfort): Center Gore (center front): Should lay perfectly flat with your breast bone. If it is painful and digging in, you need either one cup size bigger or a different style of bra. Underwire: Should rest under the arm pit just behind the breast tissue, not on the breast tissue. We like to equate this concept to a letter and an envelope: the envelope (underwire) must be slightly larger than the letter (breast) so that the letter fits comfortably inside. If the underwire pokes or rests on top of the breast, you need a larger cup size or a different style of bra for your body type. Underwires help to hold the breasts in a position that gives you the most support and lift. We recommend bras with the support of wires. If you have had a medical procedure and are unable to wear underwires, or are still bothered by wires after a professional fitting, there are brands who make specially designed wire-free bras that still give great support without using underwires

What is the difference between a plunge and a push-up bra?

Plunge bras have a very low v-shaped neckline. The center front has minimal coverage and the cups are specially designed to provide support while showcasing your curves. Plunge bras can come with or without padding. 

Push-up bras are specially designed with additional padding in the cups to emphasize your bust-line and give you cleavage.

What is a demi bra?

“Demi” is French for “half” so it literally means a bra with half cups. Demi bras come with and without padding. “Demi” just refers to the coverage of the cup itself. 

Do you have to purchase a different size when you buy a strapless bra?

You should purchase the same size as any other bra. Bra manufacturers take into consideration that you don’t want your strapless to slide down, so we specially reinforce the band and add a silicone gripper strip inside of the band to help the bra stay in place.

What is the proper way to put on a bra?

Hook the bra in the back, around the waist and pull the bra up just underneath your breasts, slide each shoulder strap on. If hooking the bra in the back is difficult for you, hook the bra in the front, around the waist, spin around to the back, pull the bra up just underneath your breasts, slide each shoulder strap on.

Pull the band down in the back, so it is horizontal and parallel with the floor. It should be low and snug sitting just below your shoulder blades.

The most important part (which most women skip!), is to make sure your breasts are fully inside the cups of the bra. Bend forward at the waist, take your right hand and gather your left breast as far back as under the arm pit, pull forward and place completely into the cup. You are scooping all of the breast tissue and swooping it into the center of the cup. Now repeat with the other side. Stand up straight. You may need to grab the bottom of the wires and slide the bra right and left to get the center front to lay flat against your breast bone.

Re-check that the band is still low and snug situated under the shoulder blades, parallel to the floor.

Why are there different coverage levels of bras? Which one is right for me?

Generally, there are three coverage levels of bras: demi, ¾ (medium coverage) and full coverage.

Coverage is mainly a matter of preference, but it is necessary to have more or less coverage depending on your wardrobe.

A common misconception is that full coverage bras are for larger sizes and demi bras are only for smaller sizes. Most bra manufacturers make all three coverage levels to cater to all bra sizes.

Why do my bra straps fall off my shoulders?

Your straps should sit straight (vertically), there should be tension, but you should be able to run a finger under them comfortably.

If your straps are constantly falling down, you may need to find a bra with more strap adjustability (fully-adjustable straps), go down a band size so the band does the lifting instead of the straps, or this may not be a good style for your body type.

You may be one of these body types:

Petite Body Frame: The distance between your bra cups and your shoulder are less than the average woman.

Sloping Shoulders: Your shoulders slope downward slightly making it difficult for the straps to stay in place.

For both of the above, we recommend trying bras that have centered straps and/or fully-adjustable straps. When a bra has “centered straps” the cup attaches to the strap more towards the center rather than the outer side of the cup closest to the armpit.

How do I know if a bra fits correctly?

You should have a professional fitting at least once a year, but in between, you can perform your own spot checks by using our “points of fit” guide below.

Points of Fit:
Straps: Should sit straight and flat, there should be tension, but you should be able to run a finger under them comfortably.

Cups: Should lay flat against the body. If there is gapping at the top of the cup, you probably need to go down one cup size. If your breasts are ‘bulging out’ of the top cup, you need to go up at least one cup size

Center Gore (center front): Should lay perfectly flat with your breast bone. If it is painful and digging in, you need either one cup size bigger or a different style of bra.

Underwire: Should rest under the arm pit just behind the breast tissue, not on the breast tissue. We like to equate this concept to a letter and an envelope: the envelope (underwire) must be slightly larger than the letter (breast) so that the letter fits comfortably inside. If the underwire pokes or rests on top of the breast, you need a larger cup size or a different style of bra for your body type.

Band: Should lay straight (horizontal / parallel to the floor) and low across the back. It should fit snug, but you should be able to put one finger underneath. This is the most important “point of fit” in a bra since 70% of the support comes from the band! If you can fit more than one finger under the band or the band is “riding up” in the back, you need to go down at least one band size.